Saturday March 9, 2019 British Airways welcomed the arrival of the third in its series of four heritage liveries – a Boeing 747 painted in the Landor design, which will be recognisable for many as it flew on British Airways aircraft between 1984-1997. The livery was designed by Landor Associates and was unveiled in December 1984 and lasted as a livery until 1997.

The Boeing 747, registration G-BNLY, touched down at Heathrow to enter service in the afternoon. It will be flying to long-haul destinations served by the Boeing 747, with the design remaining on the aircraft until it retires in 2023.

The aircraft marks the third heritage design to join the fleet, with one final design to be revealed later this month as the airline continues to celebrate its past while looking to the future in its centenary year. As with the British Overseas Airways Corporation (BOAC) liveried 747, and the British European Airways (BEA) liveried A319, the aircraft can be followed using tracking website Flightradar24.

Alex Cruz, British Airways’ Chairman and CEO, said: “The Landor livery is one of our most famous designs, and many will remember seeing it in the skies at some point in their lives. Introducing these liveried aircraft has been a huge honour, and we’re excited to reveal details of the final design soon.

In its centenary year British Airways is hosting a range of activities and events. As well as looking back, the airline is also hosting BA 2119 – a programme, which will lead the debate on the future of flying and explore the future of sustainable aviation fuels, the aviation careers of the future and the customer experience of the future.

The airline will be working with expert partners to identify BA’s 100 Great Britons; the people up and down the country who are currently shaping modern Britain, and of course, the year would not be complete without some special flying and moments for customers.

The centenary activity is taking place alongside the airline’s current five-year £6.5bn investment for customers. This includes the installation of the best quality WiFi and power in every seat, fitting 128 long-haul aircraft with new interiors and taking delivery of 72 new aircraft. The airline will also be introducing new Club World seat with direct aisle access later this year.

Landor and British Airways

In 1939 following a Government review, Imperial Airways and British Airways were nationalised to form British Overseas Airways Corporation (BOAC). Continental European and domestic flights were flown by a new airline, British European Airways (BEA) from 1946. BOAC introduced services to New York in 1946, Japan in 1948, Chicago in 1954 and the west coast of the United States in 1957. BEA developed a domestic network to various points in the United Kingdom, including Belfast, Edinburgh, Glasgow and Manchester.

From 1946 until 1960, BOAC and BEA were the principal British operators of scheduled international passenger and cargo services – and they preserved Britain’s pioneering role in the industry. The 1950s saw the world enter the passenger jet era – led by BOAC, with the Comet flying to Johannesburg in 1952, halving the previous flight time.

In 1972 the businesses of BOAC and BEA were combined under the newly formed British Airways Board, with the separate airlines coming together as British Airways in 1974. In July 1979, the Government announced its intention to sell shares in British Airways and in February 1987 British Airways was privatised.

Source: British Airways
Photo credits: British Airways

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